Great Gua sha zones to treat:

  1. Head: Feng Chi (gallbladder 20)

  2. Arm: Neiguan (heart ruler 6)

  3. Elbow: Quchi (large Intestine 11)

  4. Hand: Hegu (large Intestine 4)

  5. Leg: Yang Ling Quan (gallbladder 34)

  6. Leg: Zusanli (stomach 36)

  7. Leg: San Yin Qiao (pancreas 6)

  8. Foot: Tai Chong (liver 3)

 

1. FENG CHI or WIND POOL (GALL BLADDER 20)

  • HEADACHES, MIGRAINES NECK PAIN & STIFFNESS 

 

How do you find it?

Below the base of your skull, between the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the trapezius muscle. Roughly halfway between the midline of the back of your neck and the mastoid bone below your ear.

What is it for?

This area gets a great deal of tension especially when you have headaches or suffer from stress. It affects the area above (your head) and the area below (your neck). It is a great zone for helping to reduce the severity of headaches and neck stiffness. This area is so important to remove tightness with Gua sha.

How do you treat the zone?

This is a great area for Gua sha and you can press and move the tool up and down all along the gap between bond and muscle at the back of your head.

 

2. NEIGUAN or INNER GATE (PERICARDIUM 6)

  • For NAUSEA, VOMITING, CHEST TIGHTNESS

 

How do you find it?

This one should be easy to find! Three finger widths up your forearm from your wrist crease in between the two central, and usually prominent, tendons (the palmaris longus and flexor carpi radialis).

What is it for?

Very accessible and useful zone to know in order to help with nausea. This is backed up by numerous research papers which feature PC-6 with treating morning sickness and vomiting and I can vouch for its usefulness clinically. Traditionally however this point is more connected with your cardiovascular system and specifically your heart. Pressure can also therefore help relieve a stuffy, tight chest.

How do you treat the zone?

Acupuncture patients might know this point well as the needle can touch the median nerve just below and send an electrical sensation buzzing into their fingers.

When you put pressure on the point with the Gua sha tool, you shouldn’t feel anything like this but it may feel sensitive so be cautious. Press and circle the point, gradually increasing pressure but not too hard. Do this for a few minutes only and then stop, rest and repeat as necessary.

3. QU CHI or POOL AT THE BEND (LARGE INTESTINE 11) 

  • For HEADACHES, PAIN IN ABDOMEN/STOMACH AREA, SORE THROAT, SHOULDER/WRIST PAIN 

 

How do you find it?

It is at the end of the elbow crease when you flex your elbow (bring it towards your body). There are probably going to be a few sore spots in this area, a little further down/up the arm. Treat any sore spot like LI-11.

On most people this area is almost always sore when pressed and if you follow the muscle down the forearm, you'll find a sharp pain you never knew you had. Got it yet? This is closer to LI-10 and can also be included in your treatment.

What is it for?

This zone is mainly associated with removing heat and is good for a sore, irritated throat. You'll also find it helps with abdominal discomfort and because of its location will affect the muscles above/below to help wrist or shoulder issues.  

How do you treat the zone?

As you can see in the picture, this is a great point for pressing with a Gua sha tool and then circling with less pressure.

 
 

4. HEGU or JOINING VALLEY (LARGE INTESTINE 4)

  • For HEADACHES, FACIAL PAIN, TOOTHACHE, COLDS

 

How do you find it?

Another easy zone to find. It is in the web of flesh between your thumb and index finger on the back of your hand. This area between the metacarpal bones is packed with useful points but you will find LI-4 around the middle of the web in the area of muscle.

What is it for?

This is the go-to area for headaches anywhere on your head. While not to be used on a pregnant woman (the origin of this prohibition is from a time when ancient physicians inserted much larger needles), it is one of the most widely used zones. 

How do you treat the zone?

This zone can be sore but can sustain a fair amount of pressure. You can press the point with the Gua sha tool. Press for 10 seconds and then circle the area. Repeat unless it feels too uncomfortable.

5. YANG LING QUAN or YANG MOUND SPRING (GALL BLADDER 34) 

  • For EFFECTS OF STRESS, TIGHT SHOULDERS, RELEASE TENDONS/LIGAMENTS, CHEST TIGHTNESS, ABDOMINAL DISCOMFORT 

 

How do you find it?

On the outside of your lower leg, below your knee you will find a knobbly bone. This is called the head of the fibula. You can find GB-34 below the outside corner (anterior and inferior) of this bony protrusion. If it feels more sore below the other corner then treat there too.

What is it for?

This is one of the most used zones and is connected with releasing tension held in tendons and ligaments. It is also used to encourage blood flow through tissues and muscles so you can use it for anything involving muscle/tendon tightness. It is also used to affect your chest and abdomen.   

How do you treat the zone?

Press the zone and the surrounding area with the tool and hold for 10 seconds, circle and then release. Use downwards Gua sha on the muscle area, but put a finger of your other hand on the head of the fibula so you don't scrape on it. 

 

6. ZUSANLI or LEG THREE MILES (STOMACH 36)

  • For STOMACH DISCOMFORT and TIREDNESS

 

How do you find it?

You will find it at a hand width below the bottom of your kneecap and one finger width outward from the tibia bone. Feel around this area until you feel a sore point. It is less the exact position and more where it feels tender in that approximate location.

What is it for?

This is the general zone for the digestive system and the stomach/abdomen area. It can also help if you're exhausted and need a little boost to get through the day.

How do you treat the zone?

Press the zone with the tool (and any sore points nearby) and hold for 10-15 seconds. Circle for another 10-15 seconds and then repeat. Use Gua sha in the wider area in order to cover more of the muscle. 

 
 

7. SAN YIN JIAO or THREE YIN INTERSECTION (PANCREAS [SPLEEN] 6)

  • For ABDOMINAL DISCOMFORT, DIGESTIVE DISORDERS, MENSTRUAL ISSUES

 

How do you find it?

You will find it at a hand width above the highest point of the inside ankle bone (the medial malleolus), just behind the tibia bone. It's another common sore area.

What is it for?

This is a versatile zone which is used to treat a variety of issues but especially the lower abdomen and bloating. It is another zone which is not to be used for pregnant women.

How do you treat the zone?

Press the area (and any sore points nearby) and hold for 10-15 seconds. Circle for another 10-15 seconds and then repeat. You can use Gua sha scraping over this area but watch out for the side of the tibia bone. 

8. TAI CHONG or GREAT SURGE (LIVER 3)

  • For HEADACHES, EYE DISCOMFORT, EFFECTS OF STRESS, TIGHT SHOULDERS

 

How do you find it?

In the gap between the metatarsal bones that lead to the big and second toes. When you press between the bones, it usually feels sore. Feel up to where the two bones meet and the zone is below this.

What is it for?

A great multi-purpose Gua sha zone which will affect your head, eyes and tensed muscles. It is good for releasing pent-up emotions like those that develop during a stressful day.

How do you massage the point?

Press the zone and hold for 10-15 seconds.  Circle for another 10-15 seconds and then repeat. 

 
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